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(Awards listed as received by Research Grants & Contracts Office.)
Please join the Grants and Contracts Office in extending congratulations to the following grant and fellowship recipients:
 

RECENT AWARDS:  July 1, 2006 - Present

TIM CHARTIER is the recipient of a grant from the Arts & Science Council for the construction of masks that will be used in his math and mime performance.  "Mime-matics," which explores math through the art of mime.  The masks will be used to communicate the history of mathematics and demonstrate the applicability of the field in addition to introducing mathematical concepts.

GERARDO MARTI received a Jack Shand Grant from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion to support research on worship and racial diversity.  Building on preliminary studies, the research focuses on observations and interviews among leaders and attenders of multiracial churches to determine how congregational music affects racial composition.

BRAD THOMAS has received a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council to support the Davidson residency and multi-media installation of contemporary Japanese artist Yuri Shibata as part of a collaborative regional exhibition scheduled for fall 2006 titled “Force of Nature.”

A. MALCOLM CAMPBELL and LAURIE HEYER have been awarded, collaboratively with Hampton University, a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation to continue the highly successful DNA microarray workshops that have been organized over the past three summers. The grant will enable faculty from a variety of institutions (with priority given to those teaching at minority-serving institutions) to receive training and resources for curriculum reforms that will reflect the genomics revolution in their undergraduate courses and independent research.

JOHN SWALLOW has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation under the Research in Undergraduate Institutions program. The award will involve students in research and dissemination at regional meetings on the teaching and application of Galois theory. Additionally, a co-authored text will introduce the subject to a wider audience, enhancing the national curricular infrastructure. 

RECENT AWARDS:  January 1, 2006 - June 30, 2006

MICHAEL DORCAS is the recipient of a grant from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to support the development of an online “Carolina Herp Atlas” that will use observations provided by the general public, scientists, conservation and wildlife professionals leading to a better understanding of the distribution of amphibians and reptiles in North Carolina.

BRAD THOMAS has received a grant from the Arts and Science Council North to support the Davidson residency and multi-media installation of contemporary Japanese artist Takasumi Abe as part of a collaborative regional exhibition scheduled for fall 2006 titled “Force of Nature.”

MICHAEL DORCAS recently received a third supplement to his National Science Foundation CAREER grant which will allow two students to participate in a collaborative study examining the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles during the next academic year.

DAVE MARTIN, CHRIS PARADISE, and PAT PERONI have received funds from the Associated Colleges of the South for the development of two team-taught environmental studies courses, one an introductory course and one senior-level course. The ACS funds will allow for broad involvement by faculty across the disciplines in the planning and discussion phases.

TIM CHARTIER is working with a student assistant on a Mathematical Device Dissection Lab under a subcontract funded as part of a College of Charleston National Science Foundation CAREER grant. The research results will have direct applicability in the classroom.

CINDY HAUSER is the recipient of a grant from the Associated Colleges of the South to develop a laboratory course for non-science majors in Environmental Chemistry. The goal of the course will be to introduce students to the scientific methods used in solving real world problems that impact our natural surroundings.

BRENDA FLANAGAN has won a two-month summer writing residency at Headlands in Sausalito, California from the North Carolina Arts Council.  This award will provide an opportunity for Flanagan to complete a novel.

PAT SELLERS has been awarded two grants from the Dirksen Congressional Center and the American Political Science Association to support a project exploring how congressional leaders and members promote and win media coverage of issues and arguments. The grants will build on previously funded research and provide for the in-depth supplemental analysis and assessment of press releases, news stories, press secretary interviews and other sources.

MARK FOLEY has received a Fulbright scholar award to teach and to do research in Budapest, Hungary in spring 2007. Foley will teach several courses in economics and develop professional relationships with Hungarian faculty for potential collaboration on research and curriculum development. Upon his return, he expects to incorporate his firsthand knowledge of the daily experiences of families and firms in Hungary into his teaching and research at Davidson.

MARK SMITH is the recipient of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) to support his research into the critical biological, pharmacological and environmental factors contributing to differences in drug-seeking behavior across subject populations. Several independent research and senior thesis students will contribute to the research project.

MIKE DORCAS has received continued funding from the Duke Energy Foundation for his herpetology research and education/outreach initiatives in the region. Dorcas’ research evaluates the impacts of urbanization on amphibian and reptile populations and provides unique opportunities for development of effective, undergraduate-based research, outreach, and conservation initiatives.

DANIEL CLAYTON, a junior chemistry major, has been awarded a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship to participate in the Chemical Science and Technology research program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Maryland.

GERARDO MARTI has been accepted into and received funding for a Calvin College Summer Seminar titled, "The Transformation of Christian Worship:  Recent History of Protestant and Catholic Practices (1960-2000)."  This two-week seminar will provide an opportunity for multidisciplinary dialogue on contemporary worship and time to work on a proposal for a book project on the relationship between congregational music and racial diversity.

GEORGIA RINGLE has received a second grant from the Mecklenburg County Health Department's Project ASSIST to continue the campaign started in the fall aimed at preventing tobacco initiation and promoting tobacco cessation among Davidson College students and employees.

RECENT AWARDS:  July 1 - December 31, 2005

FUJI LOZADA has received an award from the Howard Foundation to support a research project exploring the impact of sports and globalization on the development and maintenance of civil society in China. The research aims toward a better understanding of how the larger issues of sports as popular culture shape the values and social relations of Chinese communities in today’s highly-interconnected and commodified world.

MARK STANBACK and KRISTA HEINER '06 have been awarded an ACS environmental grant (campus-community partnership) for a project Krista is conducting at the Town of Davidson's new park on Shearer's Road, Fisher Farm Park.  The Town of Davidson has also provided funds for the project.  Twenty pairs of nest boxes have been placed at Fisher Farm Park to do a study on competition among cavity nesting birds.  In addition to carrying out the study, Krista will develop educational materials to be provided to visitors at a new informational kiosk being built and provide informational nature walks to visitors to explain the research.

DAN BOYE recently received an Associated Colleges of the South Technology Fellowship to develop curricula material in the human voice-computer interface. Exercises developed will investigate the successes and shortcomings of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Text-To-Speech (TTS) software routines. The exercises will be designed to help non-science majors explore concepts in much the same way that a scientist does.

ERLAND STEVENS is the recipient of an Associated Colleges of the South Technology Fellowship to develop interactive web-based Medicinal Chemistry exercises. The proposed web exercises will enhance student learning by providing a user-friendly, graphical means of demonstrating medicinal and biochemical concepts.

GAYLE KAUFMAN was recently awarded an American Sociological Association (ASA) Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline (FAD) grant to examine the challenges that men face in combining work and family.  The research project will assess complex aspects of work and family life, adaptation, and satisfaction, the results of which may have a potential impact on public policy.

BARBARA LOM recently received an in-kind grant of 50 male pigmented South African claw-toed frogs (Xenopus Laevis) from FantasticFrog for use in her research into how individual neurons wire themselves together into a precisely interconnected and functional nervous system.  The Xenopus laevis tadpoles lend themselves particularly well to the manipulation and observation of the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the only type of neurons that connect the eye to the brain.

GEORGIA RINGLE has received a grant from the Mecklenburg County Health Department's Project ASSIST to sponsor activities aimed at preventing tobacco initiation and promoting tobacco cessation among Davidson College students and employees.  Part of the project will involve building a coalition of advocates from the campus and community.

TIM CHARTIER has received additional funds from the Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research to continue work on numerical methods for forward and inverse problems in discontinuous media.

ANDY LUSTIG is the recipient of a grant from the Ford Foundation for support of an innovative research and policy project on the moral implications of biotechnology. The five-year “Altering Nature” project was started in 2001 while Dr. Lustig was at Rice University and will culminate in the publication of a major volume which will provide a comprehensive multidisciplinary, cross-traditional, and cross-temporal analysis of various modes of interpreting nature, how those interpretations influence religious understandings of nature, and the relevance of those insights to scholarly and public discussions of biotechnology issues.

January 1 - June 30, 2005 AWARDS

WOLFGANG CHRISTIAN and MARIO BELLONI have been awarded a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation under the Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement program.  This National Dissemination award will support the development of new upper-level curricular material by combining computational physics expertise with interactive engagement teaching techniques.  Co-principal investigators include Anne Cox (Eckerd College), Jan Tobochnik (Kalamazoo) and Harvey Gould (Clark University).

CINDY HAUSER has received a two-year grant from the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society to conduct research on heterogeneous chemistry of gas-phase oxidants and organic aerosols.

ANNIE INGRAM's research on the culture of flowers in nineteenth-century America is being supported through a Francois Andre Michaux Fund Library Fellowship from the American Philosophical Society Library, a Research Support Grant from the Maine Women Writers' Collection, and an Ernestine Richter Avery Fellowship from the Huntington Library, and a Research Fellowship from the Winterthur Foundation.

ALAN MICHAEL PARKER received a one-month summer fellowship to attend the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, a 450 acre artists' colony located at Mr. San Angelo, Virginia.  his project is a collection of poems that explore various ideas related to the representation of animals, and how such images bear the burden of human desires.

MICHAEL DORCAS has been awarded a supplement to his National Science Foundation CAREER grant.  The award will provide funding during the academic year for two students to research the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles.

A. MALCOLM CAMPBELL will serve as co-principal investigator on an NSF-funded grant to Edison Fowlks of Hampton University.  The award will support a DNA microarray summer workshop for undergraduate HBCU, HSI and Tribal College faculty to be held at Morehouse College in August, 2005.

CHRIS PARADISE is the recipient of an Environmental Initiative Campus as Laboratory grant from the Associated Colleges of the South.  Funds will support a college-wide celebration of Earth Day.

GERARDO MARTI has been selected by the Congregational Studies Team to participate in the Engaged Scholars Project.  Selected Fellows receive mentoring while conducting research on the practices of local communities of faith.

CAROLE KRUGER is the recipient of a Canadian Studies Faculty Enrichment grant funded through the Canadian Embassy.  She will use the funds to attend a Quebec summer seminar and to conduct research at the University of Montreal and the University of Quebec in order to enhance the French department's survey course, "Quebec: Francophone Melting Pot."

GERARDO MARTI is the recipient of a Religious Institutions grant from The Louisville Institute.  The grant will support research between worship music and congregational diversity.

ERLAND STEVENS will use a Summer 2005 Associated Colleges of the South Technology Fellows grant to develop interactive we-based medicinal chemistry exercises.

MICHAEL DORCAS has received additional funding from the Duke Energy Environmental Center to continue work on the Catawba River Coverboard Project.  The funds support data collection on animal species in the Catawba Corridor.

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